Long duration M1.8 solar flare produces a full halo, Earth-directed CME

Long duration M1.8 solar flare produces a full halo, Earth-directed CME

A long duration solar flare measuring M1.8 at its peak time erupted from central Region 2473 at 12:45 UTC on December 28, 2015. The event started at 11:20 and ended at 14:09 UTC. The flare produced a full halo CME heading directly toward Earth.

A type IV radio sweep was associated with the event. Type IV emissions occur in association with major eruptions on the sun and are typically associated with strong coronal mass ejections and solar radiation storms.

Additionally, a 10 m Radio Burst lasting 48 minutes with peak flux of 370 sfu was associated with this event. A 10cm radio burst indicates that the electromagnetic burst associated with a solar flare at the 10cm wavelength was double or greater than the initial 10cm radio background. This can be indicative of significant radio noise in association with a solar flare. This noise is generally short-lived but can cause interference for sensitive receivers including radar, GPS, and satellite communications.

'Beta-Gamma' Region 2473 is in geoeffective position. If CME was produced by this event it should be Earth-directed. More information will be available once coronagraph imagery becomes available.

The region exhibited minor penumbral and spot growth over the last 24 hours and formed a sigmoidal signature as observed in GOES-15 x-ray imagery.

Image credit: SWPC

Solar activity is expected to be low with a chance for M-class flares (R1-R2 (Minor-Moderate) Radio Blackouts) over the next three days (December 28 - 30) with Region 2473 being the likely source of activity.

Update:

A ragged, full halo CME heading directly toward Earth was produced during today's long duration M1.8 solar flare.

WSA-ENLIL model shows CME arriving at Earth late December 30 / early December 31.

Image credit: ESA/NASA SOHO LASCO C3

SWPC alerts

Space Weather Message Code: SUM10R
Serial Number: 680
Issue Time: 2015 Dec 28 1306 UTC

SUMMARY: 10cm Radio Burst
Begin Time: 2015 Dec 28 1146 UTC
Maximum Time: 2015 Dec 28 1206 UTC
End Time: 2015 Dec 28 1231 UTC
Duration: 45 minutes
Peak Flux: 370 sfu
Latest Penticton Noon Flux: 110 sfu

NOAA Space Weather Scale descriptions can be found at
www.swpc.noaa.gov/noaa-scales-explanation

Description: A 10cm radio burst indicates that the electromagnetic burst associated with a solar flare at the 10cm wavelength was double or greater than the initial 10cm radio background. This can be indicative of significant radio noise in association with a solar flare. This noise is generally short-lived but can cause interference for sensitive receivers including radar, GPS, and satellite communications.

***

Space Weather Message Code: ALTTP4
Serial Number: 522
Issue Time: 2015 Dec 28 1215 UTC

ALERT: Type IV Radio Emission
Begin Time: 2015 Dec 28 1146 UTC

NOAA Space Weather Scale descriptions can be found at
www.swpc.noaa.gov/noaa-scales-explanation

Description: Type IV emissions occur in association with major eruptions on the sun and are typically associated with strong coronal mass ejections and solar radiation storms.

Featured image credit: NASA SDO AIA 131

Tags: m-class

Comments

Patrick Geryl 8 months ago

Dear Sirs,

There is a massive sunspot on the Farside of the Sun.

YOU CAN SEE THE SUNSPOT ON THE FARSIDE:

http://jsoc.stanford.edu/data/farside/


On December 28 it was already very large with almost 4,000 units of millionths of a solar hemisphere. Currently (December 30 08.00 UTC) there is still no update, so it could have grown even larger...

Such a sunspot is capable of destroying our civilization:

http://www.scmp.com/tech/science-research/article/1853426/blackout-causing-satellite-disabling-super-solar-storms-far



Is it possible to ask comments from a specialist?


Sincerely,


Patrick Geryl

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