Education

Monitoring volcanoes using ASTER satellite imagery

The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor is one of five sensors on board NASA's Terra satellite. ASTER data and imagery are crucial tools for monitoring volcanoes for any clues of imminent eruptions, for studying...

March 25, 2016

Madden-Julian Oscillation: Massive thunderstorm cluster in tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean explained

A team of scientists from the University of Washington (UW) have devised a new mathematical model for the purpose of explaining and forecasting the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a huge thunderstorm cluster originating in the waters of tropical Indian and Pacific...

January 29, 2016

SOHO celebrates its 20th anniversary of gazing into the Sun

Today marks the 20th anniversary of NASA/ESA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Originally planned for two-year mission, the project has now almost gone strong for two full solar-cycles, making the project longest Sun watching satellite to this day. When...

December 02, 2015

Seven spectacular weather events – and what causes them

​​The weather might seem like it creates weeks of dreary, grey drizzle. But it can also put on a truly sensational – and, often, deadly – show. But what explains these explosive events? The Earth’s atmosphere is driven by heating from the Sun....

November 29, 2015

Living with a star

The connection between the Sun and the Earth is a complex one, describing a relationship between us and our star that is both life-sustaining as well as life-threatening. This relationship is colloquially known as space weather. Aerospace engineer Ryan McGranaghan takes

May 11, 2015

Explainer: the wild storms that lash Australia’s east coast

Over the past 24 hours, the Sydney, Central Coast, and Hunter regions of New South Wales have experienced very heavy rain, gale-force winds with gusts over 100 km per hour, and waves of more than 10 m in height.For Sydney it was the wettest single day since February 200

April 21, 2015

What did the ancient people think of the axis mundi (world axis)?

In the footsteps of Mircea Eliade, mythologists and anthropologists tend to think of the axis mundi or ‘world axis’ as a straight object running through the cosmos vertically. While this is, of course, correct for the astronomical axis of the earth, the &lsq

April 09, 2015

Earthquake interaction on the scale of a fault to the planet

Ross Stein (PhD, 1980, Geology), Geophysicist at the USGS gave this interesting presentation a couple of days ago at the Stanford University. He explains the fundamentals of earthquake science and takes listeners to one of its frontiers.His research focuses on

April 25, 2014

Sonic Geometry: The Language of Frequency and Form

This might be one of the most important videos you have ever seen... "If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe." - Nikola Tesla The World is Waking... Throughout history,

December 23, 2013

Solar Dynamics Observatory - Argos view

Argos (or Argus Panoptes) was the 100-eyed giant in Greek mythology. While NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has significantly less than 100 eyes, seeing connections in the solar atmosphere through the many filters of SDO presents a number of interesting

December 17, 2013

The solar eclipse cycle - Saros cycle

The periodicity and recurrence of eclipses is governed by the Saros cycle, a period of approximately 6,585.3 days (18 years 11 days 8 hours). It was known to the Chaldeans as a period when lunar eclipses seem to repeat themselves, but the cycle is

September 01, 2013

What is a sungrazing comet?

Sungrazing comets are a special class of comets that come very close to the Sun at their nearest approach, a point called perihelion. To be considered a sungrazer, a comet needs to get within about 850,000 miles from the sun at perihelion. Many come even closer, even

August 23, 2013

Earth at aphelion on July 5, 2013

Since Earth`s orbit is an ellipse, on July 5, 2013 our planet will be on the farthest end of the curve, at the most distant point from the Sun. That is called aphelion. In Earth`s orbit the average distance from the Sun is roughly 150 million kilometers, but at

July 05, 2013

Where is the true North Pole?

The North Pole is at the top of the Earth and the South Pole is at the bottom, right? Except that the Earth is kind of a ball, and they don't really have tops and bottoms. Of course Earth isn`t exactly spherical and isn`t spinning through space - spinning about

July 03, 2013

Intro to space weather vocabulary - video

Heliophysics scientists study energy transformation from one event to the other and which electromagnetic waves create which conditions near Earth. Space weather effects can disrupt satellites in space, so scientists need to understand the system in even more detail.

May 06, 2013

MinuteEarth: Why are leaves green?

Have you ever wondered why leaves are green and not red, blue, or even black? Well, MinuteEarth released another interesting movie answering the question. Source:

March 24, 2013

Infrared: Beyond the Visible

The answers to some of the universe's greatest mysteries are being beamed through the night sky in light we can't see with human eyes ... but it won't be invisible to us forever. Explore the wonder of infrared astronomy and the promise of the upcoming Webb Space

March 22, 2013